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Current Exhibits

The Sheldon Art Galleries, located in the Emerson Galleries building, features rotating exhibits in six galleries, including photography, architecture, St. Louis artists and collections, jazz history and children's art. Artwork is also featured in The Sheldon's sculpture garden, visible from both the atrium lobby and the connecting glass bridge.

GALLERY HOURS
Tuesdays, noon – 8 p.m.
Wednesdays - Fridays, noon – 5 p.m.
Saturdays, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Also open one hour prior to Sheldon performances and during intermission.

Closed July 4th, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year's Eve and New Year's Day.

Please join us for an opening reception on Friday, March 2 from 5-7 p.m. The Galleries will remain open until 9 p.m. for First Fridays in Grand Center.

Bellwether Gallery of St. Louis Artists
Deborah Douglas: Past, Present, Future Tense

Deborah Douglas: Past, Present, Future Tense

March 2, 2018 - April 21, 2018

St. Louis-based artist Deborah Douglas works with a variety of materials, including oil, enamel, watercolor, ink, graphite, collage and digital prints. In her large-scale works on paper, she deals with issues of domesticity that include references to food, relationships, gender and equality.

The exhibition is made possible in part by Elissa and Paul Cahn.

Gallery Talk: Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 6 p.m.
Deborah Douglas speaks about her work and influences. Admission free, but reservations are encouraged. Contact Paula Lincoln at plincoln@thesheldon.org or 314-533-9900 x37.

Gallery of Music
The World of Spectacular Strings

The World of Spectacular Strings

The World of Spectacular Strings

October 6, 2017 - April 21, 2018

Drawn from The Sheldon’s Hartenberger World Music Collection, this exhibit features over 100 unique stringed instruments from around the world. Highlights include a rare Rubab from Afghanistan, an unusual pochette (pocket) violin from France, a double bass and violin made from matchsticks, a harpsichord once owned by former St. Louis resident comedienne Phyllis Diller, a Gibson guitar signed by B.B. King, and a special edition KISS logo Gene Simmons “Axe” bass, among many other rare instruments.

Exhibit made possible in part by Aurelia and Jeffrey Hartenberger.

Gallery Talk: Tuesday, March 6, 6-7:30 p.m.
Dr. Aurelia Hartenberger, "Stringed Instruments: Their Function and Artistry,” with special guest, harpsichordist Charles Metz who will play the Phyllis Diller harpsichord on view. Admission free. Reservations are encouraged, but not required.Call Paula Lincoln at 314-533-9900 x37 or email plincoln@thesheldon.org.

Gallery of Photography
Bride of the Desert: An Exploration of Palmyra

Bride of the Desert: An Exploration of Palmyra

March 2, 2018 - April 21, 2018

Once a thriving caravan city of the Roman frontier during the 1st – 3rd centuries CE, Palmyra contained an array of temples, colonnaded streets, theatres and commercial areas. Today the city, now in war-torn Syria, has been almost completely destroyed. Curated by photo historian David R. Hanlon, the exhibit presents a group of 19th century and contemporary photographs of Palmyra and others from local public and private collections by Michael J. Fuller, Frank Mason Good, David R. Hanlon, John Henry Haynes, Don McCullin and others. Augmenting the exhibition will be motion graphic and virtual reality pieces created for this exhibition by designers at St. Louis Community College.

The exhibition is made possible by Yvette and John Dubinsky, with additional support from Christner, Inc., Jeremy Hinton; and Barbara and Arthur McDonnell, with in-kind support from Olin Library Special Collections, Washington University in St. Louis.

Gallery Talk: Tuesday, March 13, 2018, 6 p.m.
Ancient Palmyra: Oasis to Empire by Dr. Michael Fuller, Professor Emeritus, St. Louis Community College, Board Member, Archaeological Institute of America, St. Louis chapter and Co-Director of American archaeological expedition to Tell Tuneinir, Syria (1986-2001), with introduction by exhibition curator, David R. Hanlon. Admission free, but reservations are encouraged. Contact Paula Lincoln at plincoln@thesheldon.org or 314-533-9900 x37.

Bernoudy Gallery of Architecture
Remembering Gene Mackey (1938-2016)

Remembering Gene Mackey (1938-2016)

March 2, 2018 - April 21, 2018

The exhibit pays tribute to the life and work of St. Louis based architect Gene Mackey, founder of the firm Mackey Mitchell Architects, known for the Alberici Headquarters, a LEED Platinum building; the Central Institute for the Deaf, Dennis & Judith Jones Visitor and Education Center in Forest Park; Christian Brothers College High School; the design of the A. Wessell Shapleigh Fountain at the Missouri Botanical Garden and the current renovation of Soldiers Memorial and Court of Honor.

The exhibition is made possible through in-kind support by Mackey Mitchell Architects, with additional support from Philip and Mary Mackey and Alper Audi Inc., Structural Engineers.

AT&T Gallery of Children's Art
School Focus: Cardinal Ritter College Prep Student Exhibit

School Focus: Cardinal Ritter College Prep Student Exhibit

March 2, 2018 - April 21, 2018

Drawings, paintings and ceramics by students of Cardinal Ritter College Prep High School, under the tutelage of art department chair, Richard Hunt are featured in this multi-media exhibit.

The exhibition is made possible in part by the Cady Family Foundation.

Nancy Spirtas Kranzberg Gallery
Saint Louis Story Stitchers Artists Collective: Pick the City UP

Saint Louis Story Stitchers Artists Collective: Pick the City UP

March 2, 2018 - April 21, 2018

The exhibition presents an overview of recent Saint Louis Story Stitchers projects that focus on stopping gun violence and furthers the message through music videos, colorful documentary photographs, youth poetry from the Curating Teen Voices portfolio and music and spoken word events. St. Louis Story Stitchers is a non-profit organization in St. Louis founded in 2013 by Susan Colangelo, whose mission is to document Saint Louis through art and written and spoken word to promote understanding, civic pride, intergenerational relationships and literacy.

Funding for this exhibition was provided in part by Missouri Foundation for Health through a grant to Saint Louis Story Stitchers. Additional support from Alison and John Ferring.

Special Event: Pick the City UP Glo Sho!
Tuesday, March 20, 7:30 - 8:30 p.m., Sheldon Concert Hall

Pick the City UP Glo Sho! presents Saint Louis Story Stitchers' unique brand of urban storytelling, featuring original, family-friendly spoken word, hip hop music and B-Boy dance moves on public health issues, including gun violence prevention. St. Louis'’ top young performers and their mentors will encourage attendees to become a part of the movement to help make our city a healthier and happier place for all. Featured are Bobby Norfolk, Britt Baker and KP Dennis, along with members of the Story Stitchers Youth Council. Admission Free (suggested donation $10), all ages welcome.

Ann Lee and Wilfred Konneker Gallery
Jim Dine Sculpture dedicated to the memory of Dr. Leigh Gerdine

Jim Dine Sculpture dedicated to the memory of Dr. Leigh Gerdine

Ongoing Exhibit

The Ann Lee and Wilfred Konneker Gallery at the Sheldon Art Galleries is the site for the Jim Dine sculpture, The Heart Called Orchid, 2003. The sculpture is dedicated to the life and accomplishments of Dr. Leigh Gerdine, a founding trustee of the Sheldon Arts Foundation who devoted himself to the saving and renovation of the historic Sheldon Concert Hall and the creation of the Sheldon Art Galleries.

A beautiful bronze work on long-term loan from the Gateway Foundation St. Louis, the sculpture is a glowing golden heart that balances on its point on a trompe d'oeil "wooden" pallet, which on further examination is seen also to be made of bronze. A recurring theme in Dine's work since 1966, the heart emerges in prints, drawings, paintings and sculptures.

Jim Dine was born in 1935 in Cincinnati, Ohio and rose to prominence in the 1960s with his performance and assemblage works. From the 1960s, Dine also began to incorporate representations of simple everyday objects into his works. His object-based imagery seen in paintings, drawings, prints and sculptures include tools, men's suits, bathrobes, hearts, and household objects among others and are metaphors for childhood memories, personal psychological states and self-portraits. Like Dine's suit and bathrobe images make reference to the artist's body and persona, his hearts contain layered metaphors about the body, sensuality, love, and as the artist describes them, he sees the heart as "the agent and the organ of my emotions."